“The One I Love” by R.E.M. (1987)

The Lord Is My Chef Sunday Music by Fr. Nick F. Lalog II, 17 October 2021
Photo by Alex Powell on Pexels.com

Finally, I have found an opportunity this Sunday to feature one of our most favorite bands in the 1980’s with its superb music and mysterious – and controversial lyrics – R.E.M. with their first hit song in 1987 The One I Love that has often been misinterpreted by many people as a straightforward love song when in fact it is the opposite.

According to lead vocal Michael Stipe, he was hesitant at first in recording this song because it is about people using people repeatedly for selfish gains, describing it as so “brutal” with a line that says “A simple prop to occupy my time” – of how a man uses the one he “loves” like a thing!

This one goes out to the one I love
This one goes out to the one I've left behind
A simple prop to occupy my time
This one goes out to the one I love
Fire
Fire
This one goes out to the one I love
This one goes out to the one I've left behind
A simple prop to occupy my time
This one goes out to the one I love

Stipe explained that the song never referred to any actual person nor event except that the band simply played up its lyrics while on tour with just one word at its chorus which is “Fire”.

One can readily find that it is not a love song at all by watching its music video that is generally dark except for some scenes of blue skies with white clouds that featured empty apartments and sad-looking couples.

But such is the genius of these four men who got together to form R.E.M. while students at the University of Georgia in 1980 as one of the earliest alternative rock bands who’s other major hit is called “Losing My Religion” – another song that one must not take literally as anti religion. But, that is another story we are reserving in the future.

We chose R.E.M.’s The One I Love because of its direct relationship with our Sunday gospel, especially at that part in the end when Jesus summoned the Twelve to himself to explain to them the basis of their relationships after the ten became indignant with the brothers James and John’s request from him to be seated at his right and his left when he assumes his kingship as the Messiah or Christ.

“You know that those who are recognized as rulers over the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great ones make their authority over them felt. But it shall not be so among you. Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant; whoever wishes to be first among you will be the slave of all. For the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many.”

Mark 10:42-45

Here we find Jesus clearly telling us how our relationships must be based on love and respect, serving the lowest and weakest among us unlike the way of the world that is based on power and dominance where everyone tries to escape sufferings and persecutions (https://lordmychef.com/2021/10/16/the-things-we-wish-vs-things-we-pray-to-jesus/).

Love always calls for giving up of self, thinking always the good of the other person. Not using them as props.

*We have no intentions of infringing into the copyrights of this music and its uploader except to share its beauty and listening pleasure.

From YouTube.com.

“Question Me An Answer” by Burt Bacharach/Bobby Van (1973)

The Lord Is My Chef Sunday Music by Fr. Nick F. Lalog II, 10 October 2021
Photo by Dr. Mylene A. Santos, MD, 2020.

I used to tell my students before that a person is known more with the questions he/she asks than with the answers he/she gives. Too often, our answers are wrong or not certain but if we ask the right questions, even if we do not have the answers immediately, we shall get the right answer at the right time as we mature in life.

What matters most is we ask the right question always.

And that is why we have chosen “Question Me An Answer” from the 1973 movie of the 1933 novel The Lost Lost Horizon for our Sunday music this week. Written by Burt Bacharach and sang by the late Bobby Van in the movie, Question Me An Answer may sound very American and colonial but still, the message is never lost, especially if you listen well to Van’s introduction to his students at Shangri-La.

In this Sunday’s gospel, we find Jesus being asked by a man and then by Peter with questions we ourselves also ask sometimes because deep inside us, we are worried that no one can seem to provide us with the right answer.

As Jesus was setting out on a journey, a man ran up, knelt down before him, and asked him, “Good teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?” 

Mark 10:17

According to Mark, the man’s “face fell and went away for he had many possessions” after Jesus had answered fully his question which in turn bothered Peter who began to express to Jesus his worry over his answer to the man who had left.

Peter began to say to him, “We have given up everything and followed you.”

Mark 10:28

One of the beauties of seeking and following Jesus are the endless questions that come along our journey with him. That is why we need to pray always and ask for the gift of wisdom so we may be guided in this life that becomes more wonderful with the questions we ask, not with the answers we give, or even get (https://lordmychef.com/2021/10/09/our-secret-worries-in-life/).

And the good news is, next to Jesus to accompany us in this journey in life is we also have great music keeping us company.

*We have no intentions of infringing into the copyrights of this music and its uploader except to share its beauty and listening pleasure.

From YouTube.com

“I Feel Your Soul” by Noel Pointer (1981)

The Lord Is My Chef Sunday Music by Fr. Nick F. Lalog II, 03 October 2021
Photo by author, 2019.

It is a laid-back Sunday, perfect for some soul-searching while listening to great jazz music like the late Noel Pointer’s I Feel Your Soul from his 1981 album All My Reasons. Mr. Pointer is so well-loved in our country having gone about once or twice for a series of concerts before.

Born on December 26, 1954 at Brooklyn, New York, Mr. Pointer was only 13 years old when he did his first solo performance doing a Vivaldi with Symphony of the New World that was soon followed by other guest appearances in various orchestras across the United States. He began playing the violin while a high school student that by the age of 19 in college, he was already a session musician jamming with the great jazz bands of that time.

He died in 1994, two weeks before turning 40 years of age but have left such a great impact in the music scene with his life and compositions.

I Feel Your Soul blends perfectly with our Sunday gospel today which is more than just the beauty and sanctity of the sacrament of marriage but also of the need for our relationships to reflect God’s beauty and holiness. We are designed by God to enter into communion with others, to form human relationships based on love and respect, not on impulses of carnal and selfish desires (https://lordmychef.com/2021/10/02/we-are-one/).

Mr. Pointer beautifully expressed this in I Feel Your Soul which is to be a tribute to his one and only love of his life, his wife Chinita with whom he had two daughters and a son.

When people live in harmony, in true respect and love for each, it is not difficult to feel and see one’s soul that must be pure and simple, like that of a child.

We have searched the internet but could not find a copy of the lyrics of this wonderful song which we transcribed with my kinakapatid (son of my godfather) Dindo Alberto. See for yourself the eloquence of Mr. Pointer.

It happened today 
when I looked in your eyes
state of amazement to utter surprise
as you smiled to me
it was revealed to me.

Nothing on earth could 
have suited me more 
just knowing finally you'd open
the door and you let me in
to the love within.

Now I clearly see
where your heart must be
I feel your soul
your beautiful soul.

I feel your soul
through the touch of your hand
your sweet caresses that you understand
when I am not myself
you finally lend your helping hand.

It is a feel good music that makes you experience the intensity of his voice and nobility of his love, especially the violin part played by Mr. Pointer who must be have loved his wife so much that after his death, Mrs. Pointer established the Noel Pointer Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing string music education to inner city students.

Let us be more true in our love for one another, especially family and friends who are all gifts from God we have to nurture and care for.

Have a blessed week ahead.

*We have no intentions of infringing into the copyrights of this music and its uploader except to share its beauty and listening pleasure.

From YouTube.com.

“You Can Call Me Al” by Paul Simon (1986)

The Lord Is My Chef Sunday Music by Fr. Nick F. Lalog II, 26 September 2021
Photo by author, Singapore 2018.

Today’s featured music is one of our favorites by the great Paul Simon whose meaning we only realized now. We were discussing in our communication class last week the meaning of his classic Sound of Silence when I invited my senior high students to check this one too.

Released in 1986 from his seventh studio album Graceland that featured South African musicians, You Can Call Me Al according to Simon is inspired by a funny anecdote at a party he and his first wife Peggy Harper hosted in New York in 1970. Simon’s friend and fellow composer Stanley Silverman brought along the French composer and conductor Pierre Boulez who mistakenly referred to him as “Al” and his wife as “Betty”.

You Can Call Me Al became Simon’s first hit since 1980 which according to him is partly about himself and largely a man in a midlife crisis who went to South Africa at the midst of an economic embargo against that nation due to apartheid, so absorbed with so many mundane things that eventually ended up awakening to something extraordinary spiritual experience.

Filled with Simon’s poetic play with words that at first seem to be unrelated but by the time you are absorbed with his music, you realize how in this life God has blessed us with so many good things that we have marred with our selfish interests like labels and groupings, even names as Simon had experienced being referred to as “Al”!

A man walks down the street
He says, “Why am I short of attention?
Got a short little span of attention
And, whoa, my nights are so long
Where’s my wife and family?
What if I die here?
Who’ll be my role model
Now that my role model is gone, gone?”
He ducked back down the alley

With some roly-poly little bat-faced girl
All along, along
There were incidents and accidents
There were hints and allegations

If you’ll be my bodyguard
I can be your long lost pal
I can call you Betty
And Betty, when you call me, you can call me Al
Call me Al

A man walks down the street
It’s a street in a strange world
Maybe it’s the third world
Maybe it’s his first time around
Doesn’t speak the language
He holds no currency
He is a foreign man
He is surrounded by the sound, the sound
Cattle in the marketplace
Scatterings and orphanages
He looks around, around
He sees angels in the architecture
Spinning in infinity
He says, “Amen and Hallelujah!”

In our readings today, we find how people would always resort to labels and tags, names and groups in determining what is good and best for everyone when God has total freedom in dispensing his blessings to everyone. All good gifts come from God which he gives us meant to be shared with everyone for the building up of the community. How sad that in our simplistic views, we feel that we are doing a great service in jealously guarding the generous prerogatives of God and others.

In this Sunday’s gospel, Jesus reminds us that “sky’s the limit” when it comes to doing good in the name of God. The only limitation and obstacle we have to guard against in this life is sin (https://lordmychef.com/2021/09/25/and-god-said-sanaol/).

Have a lovely Sunday and a blessed week ahead with Paul Simon’s feel good video to his 1986 hit You Can Call Me Al with his friend, actor Chevy Chase.

*We have no intentions of infringing into the copyrights of this music and its uploader except to share its beauty and listening pleasure.

From YouTube.com.

“Stages” by David Benoit (1982)

The Lord Is My Chef Sunday Music by Fr. Nick F. Lalog II, 12 September 2021
Photo by author, 2019.

It is very “bed weather” this Sunday in Metro Manila with the rains hopefully putting a stop to us all from going out unnecessarily to help lower the cases of COVID-19 that have set a new record in the country yesterday with over 26,000 infections.

Reflecting on the gospel this Sunday, right away we have thought of going instrumental with David Benoit’s 1982 title track for his album with the same title Stages from which came too his more popular songs Take A Look Inside My Heart and Promise Me A Carousel.

Benoit is an American jazz pianist, composer, and producer who has charted over 25 albums since 1980 and nominated for three Grammy Awards. A frequent visitor to Manila for concerts since the 1980’s, Benoit is best remembered as performer and music director of later adaptations of the Peanuts comic strip like The Peanuts Movie (2015).

Born in 1953, Benoit studied piano at age 13 and had himself immersed with great musicians and artists of his home state of California, particularly at Los Angeles where he is now based.

His music sounds sophisticated, very appealing as it incorporates classical beat into modern tunes that soothe the soul, giving you the right chill to meditate and free your mind and soul of negativities and many other things needed to be discarded so that you may be empty and be ready to be filled with fresher and better thoughts and ideas.

This we find perfect for us to answer Jesus Christ’s question to his disciples at Caesarea Philippi, “But who do you say that I am?” (Mk.8:29).

We can never grow deep in our knowledge of Jesus and faith in him unless we are able to say with personal conviction and commitment who he is. It is a lifelong process we go through “stages” (hence, Benoit’s music) that Jesus himself assured would be difficult and painful but fulfilling (https://lordmychef.com/2021/09/11/knowing-jesus-with-conviction/).

Stay home, stay safe, and let David Benoit’s music help you in your reflections.

Have a blessed week ahead!

*We have no intentions of infringing into the copyrights of this music and its uploader except to share its beauty and listening pleasure.

From jose plays vinyl via YouTube.

“Out of Touch” by Hall & Oates (1984)

The Lord Is My Chef Sunday Music by Fr. Nick F. Lalog II, 05 September 2021
Photo by author, 2020.

The “ber” months are finally with us and despite the daily five-digit number of COVID-19 infections, so many of us seem to be so “out-of-touch” with so many who do not seem to care at all for their loved ones nor for the country like our corrupt officials. Or to God at all.

That is why we have picked Daryl Hall and John Oates’ 1984 hit Out of Touch from their album Big Bam Boom. It was the heydays of Hall and Oates who were then called the “dynamic duo” of the music world with so many hits before and after this song.

We were in college when Out of Touch came with a lot of extended and remixed versions due to its great sound that everybody loved this song.

But, behind that danceable groove and beat, Out of Touch lyrics are so in-touch with realities in life that unlike their other compositions, Hall and Oates sounded a bit philosophical here that we find it perfectly attuned with our Sunday gospel where Jesus touched the ears and tongue of a deaf to heal him of his sickness (https://lordmychef.com/2021/09/04/opening-our-ears-and-heart/).

Shake it up is all that we know
Using the bodies up as we go
I’m waking up to fantasy
The shades all around aren’t the colors we used to see
Broken ice still melts in the sun
And times that are broken can often be one again
We’re soul alone
And soul really matters to me
Take a look around

You’re out of touch
I’m out of time
But I’m out of my head when you’re not around

You’re out of touch
I’m out of time (time)
But I’m out of my head when you’re not around

Oh oh oh oh oh oh

Reaching out for something to hold
Looking for a love where the climate is cold
Manic moves and drowsy dreams
Or living in the middle between the two extremes
Smoking guns hot to the touch
Would cool down if we didn’t use them so much, yeah
We’re soul alone
And soul really matters to me
Too much

Aside from their usual poetry, Hall and Oates say something so deep using many metaphors in narrating how a wonderful romantic relationship had suddenly turned bad because the lovers had been out of touch with each other like with these lines:

I’m waking up to fantasy
The shades all around aren’t the colors we used to see
Broken ice still melts in the sun
And times that are broken can often be one again
We’re soul alone

Notice how in both stanzas they both mentioned the importance of the soul, of the heart and inner self. Or of spirituality, if you may:

Manic moves and drowsy dreams
Or living in the middle between the two extremes
Smoking guns hot to the touch
Would cool down if we didn’t use them so much, yeah
We’re soul alone

We said in our homily today that opening to God involves our whole person, our whole being. Not just our eyes and ears, but most of all our heart. And the first step for us is to take a break from our ordinary life, from our daily routines that have numbed us that we have lost our consciousness of the present moment, even of our very selves. To a certain sense, this is the grace of the pandemic – an opportunity for us all to spend more time with Jesus in prayers at home or in the church and to bond and fix those broken ties in our family. Before the pandemic, couples and children rarely have the chance to be together even at meals due to each one’s busy schedule; but, with COVID-19’s new mode of work and learning “from home”, many were thrown off balance because some have long lost their sense of being with family members.

Beginning this Sunday, let us get in touch with our true selves, with others and with God to pull through this pandemic before it gets us and tell us how out of touch we have been.

*We have no intentions of infringing on the copyrights of this music except to share its beauty and listening pleasure.

From YouTube.

“Banal na Aso, Santong Kabayo” by Yano (1994)

The Lord Is My Chef Sunday Music by Fr. Nick F. Lalog II, 29 August 2021
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

It is the last Sunday of August, the month we celebrate our National Language as we offer an Original Pilipino Music (OPM) that perfectly fits our gospel today about sincerity of our heart against all forms of hypocrisy, Yano’s “Banal na Aso, Santong Kabayo” (Holy Dog, Saintly Horse).

Released in 1994, Banal na Aso, Santong Kabayo is a cut from the band’s first album simply titled “Yano”. The band is composed of Dong Abay on vocals and Eric Gancio in guitar.

Many think Yano is from the word “Probinsiyano” or one coming from the province (probinsiya) or rural area; but, according to the band’s founder Abay in one account, yano means “simple” in their old Tagalog spoken in Quezon province.

Yano’s music is a fusion of western and ethnic Filipino but what set them apart from the other bands of the 90’s was their deep social and political themes. Unlike some bands who were just cute, Yano had depth and meaning in their songs that were poetic and even eclectic expressed in casual Filipino. One can notice right away the conviction when Abay sings even if the melody may sound light and easy like Kumusta Na, even playful (Esem)or sometimes mischievous (Tsinelas and Senti).

Banal na Aso, Santong Kabayo is “spiritual” in a sense; it opens with a man laughing sarcastically with “Hihihihihi…” to introduce some vignettes of daily hypocrisies among us:

Kaharap ko sa jeep ang isang ale
Nagrorosaryo, mata n'ya'y nakapikit
Pumara sa may kumbento
"Sa babaan lang po", sabi ng tsuper, "kase may nanghuhuli"
Mura pa rin nang mura ang ale

Banal na aso, santong kabayo
Natatawa ako, hi-hi-hi-hi
Banal na aso, santong kabayo
Natatawa ako, hi-hi-hi-hi
Sa 'yo

Like today’s gospel, Banal na Aso, Santong Kabayo is timely during this pandemic when even if we have all the soaps and alcohol to wash our hands and all the prayers to recite to stop COVID-19, the virus will persist for as long as we have no regard for the dignity of every person. Washing of hands means washing of one’s heart, of cleansing ourselves of our sins and self-centeredness and other impurities (https://lordmychef.com/2021/08/28/two-hands-and-a-heart-in-between/).

May the music of Yano help you in examining your heart today.

Have blessed week ahead!

*We have no intentions of infringing on the copyrights of this music except to share its beauty and listening pleasure.

From YouTube.com.

“Samba Song” by Bong Penera (1976)

The Lord Is My Chef Sunday Music by Fr. Nick F. Lalog II, 22 August 
Photo by author, 2019.
A blessed Sunday everyone!

We continue with our Original Pilipino Music (OPM) this Sunday amid another surge in COVID-19 cases this week with numbers going into five-digits as we ironically downgrade into lower level in quarantine controls in the metropolis.

So as not to burden you with more worries, we have chosen something light and easy, refreshingly old from 1976 as our featured music courtesy of Mr. Bong Penera called “Samba Song” with English vocals by Ms. Norma Ramirez.

More than 20 years before the country was hooked with bossa nova in the early 2000, we have all been so delighted with many great Pinoy jazz artists in the mid-70’s to 80’s, thanks to WK-FM which is now back in the internet through the efforts of the original good guys of Brother Wayne and company.

We find Penera’s Samba Song related with this Sunday’s gospel which concludes Jesus Christ’s bread of life discourse wherein the people led by his own disciples left him to return to their old ways of life when they found his teachings so difficult to accept.

Life is like a dance, a samba of Brazil or any dance. You always need a partner to truly feel its music. We need somebody in life, someone we believe in, someone we love to join us in our dance, in our journey in life especially when things are not clear at all or when we are saddled with many problems and trials.

Kung gusto kong kumanta
At gusto ko ring sumayaw
Ako'y sumisipol saka malalaman
ako pala'y payasong walang kasayaw
Bakit tayo ganito
Mga puso nati'y mailap
Lumapit ka giliw at tayo'y magsamba
Kahit minsan man lamang.

One thing I like with OPM during the 70’s is its use of Taglish or Tagalog-English that had maintained a sense of elegance, whether the English lyrics were inserted as mere lines or as stanzas like in Penera’s Samba Song.

The first two stanzas were in Tagalog sang by Penera as an exposition of his feelings, of his longing for a partner, for his beloved to come and dance with him and live with him. Then comes the response by Ramirez expressing her same feelings in English.

And this is the time for that dance
I don't feel alone because
I know that you'll stay with me
to samba through life with me.

And there you have it! A great samba tune and meaning of life, of being together, of believing and loving like in the gospel when Simon Peter answered Jesus, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life. We have come to believe and are convinced that you are the Holy One of God” (Jn.6:68-69)

Let us try “to feel at home” in Peter’s company during this pandemic to be led to a similar faith insight and commitment in Jesus no matter how difficult it may be.

Faith is like love: we believe and love not because we are sure of ourselves but because we are sure of the one we believe and love. That is why we commit our lives to our beloved. It is not primarily because of us at the center but of the other. Like Jesus. Or a loved one.

https://lordmychef.com/2021/08/21/lord-to-whom-shall-we-go-faith-in-jesus-in-time-of-pandemic/

Have a blessed week ahead, drive those blues away with our great Original Pilipino Music!

*We have no intentions of infringing on the copyrights of this music except to share its beauty and listening pleasure.

From YouTube.

“Ale, Nasa Langit Na Ba Ako?” by Bodjie Dasig (+)

The Lord Is My Chef Sunday Music by Fr. Nick F. Lalog II, 15 August 2021
Photo by Mr. Vigie Ongleo, 05 August 2021, Singapore.

We continue this Sunday our Original Pilipino Music (OPM) featuring the genius and warmth of the late Bodjie Dasig in his playful yet meaningful early hit from the 1980’s called “Ale, Nasa Langit Na Ba Ako?” (Ma’am, Am I In Heaven?).

We find it perfectly matched with our celebration today of the Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary that teaches us at the close of her life here on earth, Mary was taken body and soul to the glory of heaven (https://lordmychef.com/2021/08/14/mary-mirror-of-gods-greatness/). The same glory awaits us all in the end of time if we try to imitate the Blessed Virgin Mary in her faith, charity and unity with Christ Jesus her Son.

It is a very timely celebration giving us hope and inspiration in persevering in faith and charity as we enter our second week of lockdown with COVID-19 infections reaching record levels since the start of this pandemic last year.

And that is why we find Ale, Nasa Langit Na Ba Ako? so perfect on this cloudy and gloomy Sunday to uplift our sagging spirits, reminding us how after all the pains and darkness of life, there awaits us the glory of heaven which starts here on earth.

We were in college in the early 80’s when this song was first played on the airwaves in some select radio stations only.

Written by the late Bodjie Dasig (+2018) who also wrote the popular Sana Dalawa ang Puso Ko (I Wish I Have Two Hearts), Ale narrates the experience of a man who saw a pretty woman while driving in Cubao, causing him to get into an accident that he ended in a hospital. Upon waking up, he saw his nurse so lovely that he thought he was already in heaven!

When he was discharged from the hospital, he asked the nurse to marry him but unfortunately, she turned out to be happily married. The man was so dismayed that he did not notice the flight of stairs and fell, banging his head on the floor that he ended up being confined in the hospital again.

When he woke up in his new hospital room, he saw another lovely nurse but this time before asking if he was in heaven, he first asked if the nurse is married.

We do not know whatever happened to the man in the song but Ale tells us the common notion how a beautiful woman can always signify heaven and bliss in life. Of course, such beauty refers to more than the physical features of a woman for true beauty lies deep within the heart, mind and soul of anyone.

In her life of faith, charity, and communion in her Son Jesus Christ, the Blessed Virgin Mary is undoubtedly a woman of great beauty mirroring the greatness and goodness of God that she became the first to be assumed into heaven body and soul among humankind.

May we continue to persevere in life’s challenges to share God’s loving presence in this world filled with pains and sufferings, trials and difficulties.

We hope this song brings you some smiles and good vibes!

*We have no intentions of infringing on the copyrights of this song except to share its beauty and joy with others.

From YouTube.

“Pag Tumatagal Lalong Tumitibay” by Wadab (1979)

The Lord Is My Chef Sunday Music by Fr. Nick F. Lalog II, 08 August 2021
Photo by author, Sonnen Berg Mountain View, Davao City, 2018.

We are on the first week of our fourth lockdown in Metro Manila since this pandemic began last year. All we need at this time are good vibes to uplift the sagging spirits of our suffering people, those who have lost loved ones as well as have lost their jobs or livelihood as a result of COVID-19 and its quarantine.

Since we are also celebrating the whole of August as “Buwan ng Wika” (Month of Filipino National Language), we have chosen an Original Pilipino Music (OPM) from 1979 by a group of five gentlemen from down south calling themselves “Wadab”, the inverted name of Davao City.

Long before today’s generation had this lodi (for idol) expressions, our generation have long been speaking backwards like jeproks to refer to spoiled brats from Quezon City’s middle class living in different subdivisions called “Project” like Project 7 (spent my early childhood there), Project 2, Project 6. Invert the word “project”, make it hip by adding an “s”, you get jeproks. It was the coolest thing at that time!

Going back to Wadab’s 1979 hit called “Pag Tumatagal Lalong Tumitibay”, the song speaks about the love of a man to his beloved, telling her how his love has grown stronger and deeper for her through time, assuring her of his undying love and fidelity.

Wadab’s song is very interesting for many reasons. Our readers in the US and other English speaking countries can easily relate because like some of the OPM songs of the 70’s, the lyrics is a mixture of Tagalog or Filipino language mixed with English expressions called “Taglish” (from Tagalog + English).

Melody and music are very soothing as they were patterned after the American Philly soul sounds of the Stylistics among others.

We thought of this lovely song for this Sunday because in essence, it is what Jesus is telling us in the gospel today, his being the bread from heaven, the bread of life giving life and nourishment to all believers. It is not enough that we know Jesus in our head; we need to believe in him to experience and share the love he has for us (https://lordmychef.com/2021/08/07/knowing-believing-loving-jesus/).

Imagine Jesus serenading you with this song, assuring you of his loving presence especially in this time of trials. Try to reflect also on our depth of love for Jesus through our family and friends.

Has our love gone stronger through the years despite our failures and sins?

Before listening to our featured music this Sunday, try reflecting on these beautiful words by St. Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153) from one of his homilies about love:

"Love is fully sufficient to itself;
when it enters the heart,
it absorbs all other feelings.
The soul who loves,
loves and knows nothing more."


A blessed week ahead of you. Stay safe always.

*We have no intentions of infringing into the copyrights of this song and video except to share its beauty with others. Thank you.

From Youtube.