Familiarity need not breed contempt

The Lord Is My Chef Breakfast Recipe for the Soul by Fr. Nicanor F. Lalog II
Thursday, Week XVI, Year II in Ordinary Time, 23 July 2020
Jeremiah 2:1-3, 7-8, 12-13 >><)))*> + 0 + <*(((><< Matthew 13:10-17
Photo by author of the new bypass road that cuts through vast ricefields from Baliwag to Pulilan, January 2020. And we ask anew, what price of development and, for whom?

We are all familiar with the expression that “familiarity breeds contempt” and sad to say, it has always been true to us even with our relationship with you, God our loving and merciful Father in heaven.

Day in, day out we pray, or simply mumble prayers.

We pray more of security latch, just in case something bad happens to us.

But to be one with one, nah….

Besides, even if we do not pray, there is always somebody praying for us. We believe so.

Everywhere we see churches and your images to remind us of your presence and existence, of your love and goodness to us.

But, we take you for granted. You have become so ordinary to us that sometimes, we look for something extraordinary.

Unknown to us, that is when we stop believing in you and when we also stop living in you.

Be amazed at this, O heavens, and shudder with sheer horror, says the Lord. Two evils have my people done: they have forsaken me, the source of living waters; they have dug themselves cisterns, broken cisterns, that hold no water.

Jeremiah 2:12-13

Through your Son Jesus Christ who preached using parables, open our eyes and our ears, our hearts and our very being to begin seeing anew from the ordinary and usual things the deeper realities of your presence and love.

Familiarity need not breed contempt among us and in you.

Let familiarity remind us of your consistency in relating with us, Lord.

Let familiarity lead us to the natural flow of life rooted in you, God, so that we may discover daily the many wonders and beauty of this life; that, despite the seeming cycle and repetition even routine, we may find its deeper meaning right in our hearts where you dwell. Amen.

Van Gogh’s “The Sower” from commons.wikimedia.org.

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